The Universidad Central de Venezuela, a UNESCO heritage site in Caracas, where art, architecture, engineering, landscape, and urban planning coexist perfectly, gave me solid ground for understanding civic spaces' role in creating the culture and, eventually, healthy societies. Within that context, a combination of scientific and artistic interests shaped my mind. While investigating the diffraction pattern of a butterfly wing scale under a scanning microscope, I fell in love with light. I was 22. My unique path has given me a particular idea of what working with lighting should be. I have learned from architecture, engineering, painting, films, opera, theatre, sculpture, photography, dance, and fashion. Lighting encompasses it all: you need to be a visual artist, an enlightened engineer, a contributor to the design of architecture, landscape, interiors, and a conscious energy manager in the era of climate change. I have focused my work on lighting as my primary medium in architecture, urban environments, landscape, and sculpture. Tonal ranges and kinetic attributes are part of my visual research in applying light. When I create sculptures, I use natural and artificial lighting to transform the perception of the objects I create, preferring mirror-polished stainless steel, transparent acrylic, or water. When I work in architecture, I pursue a mixture of style and efficiency, making the spaces feel good and look good. My career as a lighting artist extends for more than 30 years, from when I began creating mirror chambers. I studied sculpture in Caracas following the kinetic school. I learned and explored the techniques developed by previous artists. Using Moire patterns with stainless-steel mesh became a motive for exploration and materials reflecting sunlight. Tricorn, on the NPS James Monroe Memorial Park on Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, DC., uses water, bubbles, and lighting as an art medium. The first type of water lantern I developed - which gives the impression of a colored block of melting ice - stands now in the middle of a basin cast in the 1960s not far from the White House in memory of a Founding Father and the republic over which he presided from 1817 to 1825.
Duilio Passariello Studio Lighting Art & Design
The Universidad Central de Venezuela, a UNESCO heritage site in Caracas, where art, architecture, engineering, landscape, and urban planning coexist perfectly, gave me solid ground for understanding civic spaces' role in creating the culture and, eventually, healthy societies. Within that context, a combination of scientific and artistic interests shaped my mind. While investigating the diffraction pattern of a butterfly wing scale under a scanning microscope, I fell in love with light. I was 22. My unique path has given me a particular idea of what working with lighting should be. I have learned from architecture, engineering, painting, films, opera, theatre, sculpture, photography, dance, and fashion. Lighting encompasses it all: you need to be a visual artist, an enlightened engineer, a contributor to the design of architecture, landscape, interiors, and a conscious energy manager in the era of climate change. I have focused my work on lighting as my primary medium in architecture, urban environments, landscape, and sculpture. Tonal ranges and kinetic attributes are part of my visual research in applying light. When I create sculptures, I use natural and artificial lighting to transform the perception of the objects I create, preferring mirror-polished stainless steel, transparent acrylic, or water. When I work in architecture, I pursue a mixture of style and efficiency, making the spaces feel good and look good. My career as a lighting artist extends for more than 30 years, from when I began creating mirror chambers. I studied sculpture in Caracas following the kinetic school. I learned and explored the techniques developed by previous artists. Using Moire patterns with stainless-steel mesh became a motive for exploration and materials reflecting sunlight. Tricorn, on the NPS James Monroe Memorial Park on Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, DC., uses water, bubbles, and lighting as an art medium. The first type of water lantern I developed - which gives the impression of a colored block of melting ice - stands now in the middle of a basin cast in the 1960s not far from the White House in memory of a Founding Father and the republic over which he presided from 1817 to 1825.
Duilio Passariello Studio Lighting Art & Design
The Universidad Central de Venezuela, a UNESCO heritage site in Caracas, where art, architecture, engineering, landscape, and urban planning coexist perfectly, gave me solid ground for understanding civic spaces' role in creating the culture and, eventually, healthy societies. Within that context, a combination of scientific and artistic interests shaped my mind. While investigating the diffraction pattern of a butterfly wing scale under a scanning microscope, I fell in love with light. I was 22. My unique path has given me a particular idea of what working with lighting should be. I have learned from architecture, engineering, painting, films, opera, theatre, sculpture, photography, dance, and fashion. Lighting encompasses it all: you need to be a visual artist, an enlightened engineer, a contributor to the design of architecture, landscape, interiors, and a conscious energy manager in the era of climate change. I have focused my work on lighting as my primary medium in architecture, urban environments, landscape, and sculpture. Tonal ranges and kinetic attributes are part of my visual research in applying light. When I create sculptures, I use natural and artificial lighting to transform the perception of the objects I create, preferring mirror-polished stainless steel, transparent acrylic, or water. When I work in architecture, I pursue a mixture of style and efficiency, making the spaces feel good and look good. My career as a lighting artist extends for more than 30 years, from when I began creating mirror chambers. I studied sculpture in Caracas following the kinetic school. I learned and explored the techniques developed by previous artists. Using Moire patterns with stainless-steel mesh became a motive for exploration and materials reflecting sunlight. Tricorn, on the NPS James Monroe Memorial Park on Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, DC., uses water, bubbles, and lighting as an art medium. The first type of water lantern I developed - which gives the impression of a colored block of melting ice - stands now in the middle of a basin cast in the 1960s not far from the White House in memory of a Founding Father and the republic over which he presided from 1817 to 1825.
Duilio Passariello Studio Lighting Art & Design
The Universidad Central de Venezuela, a UNESCO heritage site in Caracas, where art, architecture, engineering, landscape, and urban planning coexist perfectly, gave me solid ground for understanding civic spaces' role in creating the culture and, eventually, healthy societies. Within that context, a combination of scientific and artistic interests shaped my mind. While investigating the diffraction pattern of a butterfly wing scale under a scanning microscope, I fell in love with light. I was 22. My unique path has given me a particular idea of what working with lighting should be. I have learned from architecture, engineering, painting, films, opera, theatre, sculpture, photography, dance, and fashion. Lighting encompasses it all: you need to be a visual artist, an enlightened engineer, a contributor to the design of architecture, landscape, interiors, and a conscious energy manager in the era of climate change. I have focused my work on lighting as my primary medium in architecture, urban environments, landscape, and sculpture. Tonal ranges and kinetic attributes are part of my visual research in applying light. When I create sculptures, I use natural and artificial lighting to transform the perception of the objects I create, preferring mirror-polished stainless steel, transparent acrylic, or water. When I work in architecture, I pursue a mixture of style and efficiency, making the spaces feel good and look good. My career as a lighting artist extends for more than 30 years, from when I began creating mirror chambers. I studied sculpture in Caracas following the kinetic school. I learned and explored the techniques developed by previous artists. Using Moire patterns with stainless-steel mesh became a motive for exploration and materials reflecting sunlight. Tricorn, on the NPS James Monroe Memorial Park on Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, DC., uses water, bubbles, and lighting as an art medium. The first type of water lantern I developed - which gives the impression of a colored block of melting ice - stands now in the middle of a basin cast in the 1960s not far from the White House in memory of a Founding Father and the republic over which he presided from 1817 to 1825.
Duilio Passariello Studio Lighting Art & Design